When "Late" Doesn’t Mean Dead

When "Late" Doesn't Mean Dead

I introduced you to Ignatius Grantham in Playing Hide and Seek with Records from Burned Counties. Ignatius was a very interesting man so I did a followup post, Ignatius Grantham and the Land Entry Files. I want to go back to Ignatius and Catherine's 1825 divorce one last time because there is a term that was used in one of the documents that might confuse a researcher. 

“To the Sheriff of Hancock — County Greeting 
We Command you, that of the goods and chattels Lands
and Tenements of Wm C. Seaman for Catherine Grantham —
late of your county…” 
[emphasis mine]

late of your county sounds like Catherine is dead, especially since someone else, William Seaman, is acting on her behalf. In this case “late of your county” simply means that she used to live in Hancock County, Mississippi but no longer resides there.

Appellate court document
(click image to enlarge)

Mississippi High Court of Errors and Appeals, Drawer no. 65, Case no. 15, Catherine Grantham vs. Ignatius Grantham, 21 February 1825; Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Jackson. 

When analyzing your own records be sure to check for words that might have multiple or historical meanings and then make sure you choose the correct contextual meaning. It could mean all the difference in how you interpret a document!

What kind of double meaning words have you come across in your research?

 

Michele Simmons Lewis, CG® is part of the Legacy Family Tree team at MyHeritage. She handles the enhancement suggestions that come in from our users as well as writing for Legacy News. You can usually find her hanging out on the Legacy User Group Facebook page answering questions and posting tips.

 

Michigan Section Manager Appointment Begins on January 1

Jim Kvochick, K8JK, of Brighton, Michigan, has been appointed as Michigan Section Manager for the first half of next year. His appointment will begin on January 1, 2018, and will continue through June 30. Kvochick was appointed by ARRL Radiosport Manager Norm Fusaro, W3IZ, in consultation with ARRL Great Lakes Division Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, and outgoing Michigan Section Manager Larry ...

How to Add a Newspaper Article to Legacy Family Tree

2017-11-17-image500blog  

It was a Friday afternoon, Geoff had completed his projects at work, and he was anxious to add the newspaper article that he found last night to his Legacy family file. So he pulled up his webinar software and hit the record button.

In this webinar, join Legacy's Geoff Rasmussen as he adds the newspaper article to his real, personal Legacy family file. You will learn the seven steps of adding any online document to Legacy as he guides you, unscripted, through the simple process.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 28 minute recording of "Watch Geoff Live: Adding a Newspaper to Legacy" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership

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  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Find Your Immigrant Ancestors AND their Relatives in the New York Passenger Arrival Records by Mike Mansfield. November 30
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

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Ballots Counted in 2017 Director, Vice Director Elections

 

 

The votes are in, and the ballots have been tallied at ARRL Headquarters in contested Director and Vice Director elections.

In a two-way race to fill the Dakota Division Director’s chair being vacated by Kent Olson, KA0LDG, the Division’s members have elected Matt Holden, K0BBC, of Bloomington, Minnesota. Holden, the current Vice Director, received 698 votes, while Dean Summers, N0ND, of Dicki...

The K7RA Solar Update

Thirteen days of zero sunspots ended on Tuesday, with sunspot numbers of 14, 14, and 15 on Tuesday through Thursday.

In this week’s bulletin average daily sunspot numbers increased from 0 to 4, while average daily solar flux decreased slightly from 70.8 to 70.3. Average planetary A index decreased from 15.6 to 12.3, and average mid-latitude A index declined from 12.4 to 8.6.

Predicted solar flux ...

New "Member Friday" Webinar – Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor by James Beidler

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor by James Beidler

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them!   This Friday enjoy "Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor" by James M. Beidler. If you're not a member,  remember the webinar previews are always free.

Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor

Applying genealogical basics to the peculiarity of searching for the rich records relating to America’s first large ethnic minority population - Germans.

  Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor by James Beidler

_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview 

JimBeidler_144x144About the Presenter

James M. Beidler is the author of The Family Tree German Genealogy Book, Trace Your German Roots Online, as well as writes Roots & Branches, an award-winning weekly newspaper column on genealogy that is the only syndicated feature on that topic in Pennsylvania. He is also a columnist for German Life magazine and is editor of Der Kurier, the quarterly journal of the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society.

 
He was the President of the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors from 2010 to 2012, and is the former Executive Director for the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. He served as national co-chairman for the 2008 Federation of Genealogical Societies conference in Philadelphia.
 
Beidler is also frequent contributor to other periodicals ranging from scholarly journals such as The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine to popular-interest magazines such as Ancestry Magazine and Family Tree Magazine. He also wrote the chapter on genealogy for Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth, published jointly by the Penn State Press and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
As a lecturer, he was a part of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council's acclaimed Commonwealth Speakers program from 2002 to 2009, and has been a presenter at numerous conferences. In addition to being a member of numerous genealogical, historical, and lineage societies, Beidler also sits on Pennsylvania's State Historic Records Advisory Board as well as the selection committee for the Pennsylvania Digital Newspaper Project.
 
He is a Senior Tax Advisor for an H&R Block franchise and previously was a copy editor for 15 years for The Patriot-News newspaper in Harrisburg, PA.
 
Beidler was born in Reading, PA, and raised in nearby Berks County, where he currently resides and is an eighth-generation member of Bern Reformed United Church of Christ. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, with a BA in Political Science in 1982.
 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 619 classes in the library 834 hours of quality genealogy education)
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  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

New "Member Friday" Webinar – Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor by James Beidler

New "Member Friday" Webinar - Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor by James Beidler

Every Friday we're pleased to offer Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers a new bonus webinar just for them!   This Friday enjoy "Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor" by James M. Beidler. If you're not a member,  remember the webinar previews are always free.

Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor

Applying genealogical basics to the peculiarity of searching for the rich records relating to America’s first large ethnic minority population - Germans.

  Searching for a Pennsylvania German Ancestor by James Beidler

_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview 

JimBeidler_144x144About the Presenter

James M. Beidler is the author of The Family Tree German Genealogy Book, Trace Your German Roots Online, as well as writes Roots & Branches, an award-winning weekly newspaper column on genealogy that is the only syndicated feature on that topic in Pennsylvania. He is also a columnist for German Life magazine and is editor of Der Kurier, the quarterly journal of the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society.

 
He was the President of the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors from 2010 to 2012, and is the former Executive Director for the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. He served as national co-chairman for the 2008 Federation of Genealogical Societies conference in Philadelphia.
 
Beidler is also frequent contributor to other periodicals ranging from scholarly journals such as The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine to popular-interest magazines such as Ancestry Magazine and Family Tree Magazine. He also wrote the chapter on genealogy for Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth, published jointly by the Penn State Press and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
As a lecturer, he was a part of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council's acclaimed Commonwealth Speakers program from 2002 to 2009, and has been a presenter at numerous conferences. In addition to being a member of numerous genealogical, historical, and lineage societies, Beidler also sits on Pennsylvania's State Historic Records Advisory Board as well as the selection committee for the Pennsylvania Digital Newspaper Project.
 
He is a Senior Tax Advisor for an H&R Block franchise and previously was a copy editor for 15 years for The Patriot-News newspaper in Harrisburg, PA.
 
Beidler was born in Reading, PA, and raised in nearby Berks County, where he currently resides and is an eighth-generation member of Bern Reformed United Church of Christ. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, with a BA in Political Science in 1982.
 
Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 619 classes in the library 834 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 2,857 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2017! All live webinars are free to watch.

2017speakers

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

Midwestern State Censuses Provide Critical Information

Midwestern State Censuses Provide Critical Information

Often times, census records are a way in which a genealogist paints a virtual picture of a family unit over time. Federal censuses in the U.S. are taken every ten years and a lot can happen to a family in ten years. Deaths, births, divorce, and moves are just the tip of the iceberg. Follow along with me as I share how accessing state censuses across the Midwest provided critical information to answer what happened to the Lockwood family.

The Lockwood Family in the Federal Censuses

I first found Lewis Lockwood and Sabrina Robinson as the parents of Frank Ren Lockwood (born circa 1858) on a family group sheet passed down to me. According to the vague information, the family was from New York and consisted of three children, Lewellen, Fanny, and Frank. The story attached to the family group sheet indicated Lewis was a traveling clergyman and had moved the family from New York to Iowa. Sabrina had died and the children ended up living with family members. Further, only vital information for Frank was indicated on the family group sheet.

I quickly found who I thought was the “right” family in the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Chicksaw County, Iowa. But there was a problem right out of the gate. Frank, his siblings, and his mother Sabrina all matched. But the head of household was Benjamin…not Lewis. Ironically, this Benjamin was a clergyman. Was this the right family?

BenjaminLockwood_BlogImage1
1860 US Census, Fredricksburg, Chickasaw, Iowa, population schedule, page 77, dwelling 653, family 565, Benjamin Lockwood; digital image, MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com : accessed 1 Nov 2017); citing NARA publication M653.

You’ll have to take my word for it, but yes, this was the right family. I continued my search in the 1870, 1880, and 1900 censuses to find the family again, but was never able to locate them. This 1860 census was the one-and-only federal census where the family appeared together. By 1870, the parents and Lewellen were nowhere to be found and Frank and Fanny were living in different homes just as was passed down in family tradition.

I was left with more questions than answers. Was their father’s name actually Benjamin? What happened to the father and mother? What happened to Lewellen? By using only federal census records, I could have never answered these questions, but by using state censuses, I was able to piece their story together.

Using State Censuses

Iowa took several state censuses. Some only listed the heads-of-household, but others named each person in the residence and asked each enumerated person who their parents were. Yes, you read that right! In 1925, the Iowa State Census asked every person who their parents were, including their mother’s maiden name.

I knew Frank grew up and lived out his life in Linn County, Iowa. I hoped he would appear in the 1925 state census and record his parents by name. That would answer my question about the father being named Benjamin or Lewis. I did a search for him in the 1925 Iowa State census. He was in Linn County and listed his parents as Lewis Lockwood and Sabrina Robinson. Just for fun, I decided to search for any person who had parents named Lewis Lockwood and Sabrina Robinson.

I found three! Frank, Llewellyn [Lewellen], and Louisa. At first, I thought Louisa might be Fanny found in the 1860 census. This Louisa was living in the home of Lewellen and marked as his sister. But, Louisa was born in about 1862 and could not have been Fanny. Not only had I learned Lewellen had lived, but this Louisa was a missing member of the family I didn’t even know existed!

Lockwood_BlogImage2
1925 Iowa State Census, Waverly, Bremer, Iowa, population schedule, house number 31, line 82 and 83, Louisa Lockwood; digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 Nov 2017); citing Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest.

So, what happened to Fanny? I had last seen her in Linn County, Iowa in 1870. I found she had married and moved to Wisconsin. She appeared with her husband, Richard, and children in the 1900 U.S. census for Juneau County, Wisconsin, but by 1910 her little family was dispersed over several counties and residences and Richard was in Dane County listed as a widow.

Thankfully, Wisconsin also took state censuses. I found Fanny’s husband Richard Dearholt marked as a widow in the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. Though I have been unable to find Fanny’s exact death date as of yet, I have narrowed it down to between 1900 and 1905 and likely in Juneau County, Wisconsin.

The Conclusion

I have never been able to learn why Lewis was recorded as 'Benjamin' in the 1860 US Census. Further research indicated his given name was Lewis Rema Lockwood of Greene County, New York. Perhaps it was a clerical error on the part of the census taker...I guess we'll never know.

Having found Lewellen, Fanny, Frank, and Louisa in state censuses of Iowa and Wisconsin helped me to continue to follow them to their deaths. Without state censuses as a part of my research plan, I would have missed critical information. It was a lesson well learned. When available, state census records can fill in the missing decade and provide answers to your genealogy questions.

Learn more about census records from Amie's webinars in the Legacy library!

 

Amie Bowser Tennant has been passionate about genealogy and family history for the last 17 years. She was awarded the NGS Home Study Scholarship in 2011 and is currently "on the clock" for national certification. She has been very involved in the genealogical community over the years as she served as Recording Secretary for Miami County Historical and Genealogical Society [Miami, Ohio]; newsletter editor for Miami Meanderings; Lead Content Specialist at RootsBid.com; and a content creator for Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems. Today, Amie is The Genealogy Reporter teaching and reporting in the field of genealogy. Follow her blog at www.TheGenealogyReporter.com.

How DNA led to this emotional reunion

This story, which aired live on Good Morning America just today, about a mother and daughter meeting for the first time, left me - my daughter's "big strong daddy" in tears just now. Thanks to both ABC and MyHeritage DNA for sharing this emotional reunion.

Learn more about DNA at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com/DNA. Purchase your DNA kit at www.myheritage.com/DNA.

 

 

MyHeritagedna-2

RadFxSat (Fox-1B) Launch Reset for November 18; More Foxes are on the Way!

The twice-delayed launch of the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket that will transport the AMSAT RadFxSat (Fox-1B) CubeSat carrying an Amateur Radio payload and other payloads into orbit now is set for Saturday, November 18, at 0947 UTC. The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1 mission launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, had to be postponed on November 14, “due to a ra...

2017 RCA Technical Symposium on Friday, November 17, will be Streamed Live

The 2017 Radio Club of America (RCA) Technical Symposium will be streamed live on Friday, November, 17, starting at 1300 UTC and concluding at 2130 UTC, compliments of Icom America. Flash Player is required. Videos will be made available on the RCA website. RCA has posted the complete schedule.